A ranty, funny, dead-serious intersectional feminist blog.

Posts tagged “Hollywood

Don’t TELL Me We Don’t Need Feminism.

“a lot of fuzzy feminist thinking” -Frank

The following is from the editor of the Niagara Falls Reporter to film critic Michael Calleri who wondered why some of his reviews were not being published:

Michael; I know you are committed to writing your reviews, and put a lot of effort into them. it is important for you to have the right publisher. i may not be it. i have a deep moral objection to publishing reviews of films that offend me. snow white and the huntsman is such a film. when my boys were young i would never have allowed them to go to such a film for i believe it would injure their developing manhood. if i would not let my own sons see it, why would i want to publish anything about it?

snow white and the huntsman is trash. moral garbage. a lot of fuzzy feminist thinking and pandering to creepy hollywood mores produced by metrosexual imbeciles.

I don’t want to publish reviews of films where women are alpha and men are beta.

where women are heroes and villains and men are just lesser versions or shadows of females.

i believe in manliness.

not even on the web would i want to attach my name to snow white and the huntsman except to deconstruct its moral rot and its appeal to unmanly perfidious creeps.

i’m not sure what headhunter has to offer either but of what I read about it it sounds kind of creepy and morally repugnant.

with all the publications in the world who glorify what i find offensive, it should not be hard for you to publish your reviews with any number of these.

they seem to like critiques from an artistic standpoint without a word about the moral turpitude seeping into the consciousness of young people who go to watch such things as snow white and get indoctrinated to the hollywood agenda of glorifying degenerate power women and promoting as natural the weakling, hyena -like men, cum eunuchs.

the male as lesser in courage strength and power than the female.

it may be ok for some but it is not my kind of manliness.

If you care to write reviews where men act like good strong men and have a heroic inspiring influence on young people to build up their character (if there are such movies being made) i will be glad to publish these.

i am not interested in supporting the reversing of traditional gender roles.

i don’t want to associate the Niagara Falls Reporter with the trash of Hollywood and their ilk.

it is my opinion that hollywood has robbed america of its manliness and made us a nation of eunuchs who lacking all manliness welcome in the coming police state.

now i realize that you have a relationship with the studios etc. and i would have been glad to have discussed this in person with you to help you segue into another relationship with a publication but inasmuch as we spent 50 minutes on the phone from paris i did not want to take up more of your time.

In short i don’t care to publish reviews of films that offend me.

if you care to condemn the filmmakers as the pandering weasels that they are…. true hyenas.

i would be interested in that….

Frank

Jezebel hits the high points in their summary, but you’ll find the whole (very long) story at the Chicago Sun-Times blog. This is not some guy selling papers on a street-corner spouting his nonsense to anyone who doesn’t walk away fast enough. This is the editor–the person who controls what news stories people see in a local newspaper that was apparently well regarded until 2012 when editor/publisher Frank Parlato took over. Mr. Parlato is so secure in his belief that men are the superior sex that movies featuring strong female characters disgust him and he won’t publish reviews about them. Will. Not. Publish those nasty, nasty reviews with woman stuff all over them.

What else doesn’t pass Frank Parlato’s moral filter?

To those of us who know these people still exist in positions of power (and that’s anyone who was awake during the recent U.S. election cycle), this may not even come as a surprise. But every day I encounter people who think feminism is just a euphemism for women hating on men, and I’m fucking sick of it, for lack of a more elegant phrase. They’re not listening. They’re not reading. Or they’re listening to Fox and reading the Niagara Falls Reporter, I dunno. All I know is that every day I’m more and more convinced that I have to keep doing what I’m doing even if gets me into more than my share of arguments and sometimes costs me “friends.” We need feminism because there are still too many people out there, male and female, who believe that “traditional” gender roles are sacrosanct–that a man’s rightful title is Head-of-Household and a woman’s is Little-Girl-Mother-Wife whose office is in the KITCHEN (with a view of the swingset) and YES! It’s the fifties! Happy Days Are Here Again!

Not on my watch.

~Rosie


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Katharine Hepburn Kicked All the Ass.

I Love Katharine Hepburn

I love Katharine Hepburn so much. She was a feminist before most people knew the word existed. Did you know that she used to enter fancy Hollywood hotels by the back entrance because they didn’t want the proper folk to see her in pants? And she didn’t give a rat’s ass or any hoots or anything else. I’ve watched nearly all her movies (some more than once) and I think she was a great actress, but more importantly she was a great woman. She was raised (by a suffragette and a doctor who made it his life’s work to educate people about STDs–we’re talking the turn of the last century, folks) to be inquisitive and to speak her mind. She overcame tragedy (at 14 she found her older brother who’d hanged himself) and the resulting debilitating depression to become an award-winning actor who played some of the strongest, most complex female characters of her time. (Her performance in The Philadelphia Story as Tracy Lord, a spoiled socialite who awakens to the reality that she’s never going to be happy playing the role society has given her, is hilarious and heartbreaking.)

But as much as theater-goers loved to entertain the idea of women like Lord wearing pants and pushing the boundaries of ladylike behavior, her off-screen persona didn’t sit well with Hollywood and the slavering public. She was not your average starlet: smart and funny and strong, she didn’t like reporters or autograph hounds (famously telling one to “go sit on a tack”). And she was not one to be bullied. When the costume department took her pants in an apparent attempt to teach her a lesson, she walked around the studio in her underwear for the rest of the day. How kick ass is that? (Hint: Very!) And when a few of her movies flopped, they labeled her “box-office poison.” Did she quit? Did she roll over and die? Did she rail and flail against the unfairness of it all? No, she did not. I’ll tell you what she did. Actually, I’ll let Wikipedia tell you:

Hepburn masterminded her own comeback, buying out her contract with RKO Radio Pictures and acquiring the film rights to The Philadelphia Story, which she sold on the condition that she be the star. In the 1940s she was contracted to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, where her career focused on an alliance with Spencer Tracy. The screen-partnership spanned 25 years, and produced nine movies.

1928 Kate (Wikimedia Commons)

(Hepburn and Tracy were also a couple. He was married, but estranged from his wife. Kate put her career on hold to nurse him in the final years of his life. Read about it in Tracy and Hepburn: An Intimate Memoir by Garson Kanin.)

And that, my friends, is how you do it Kate style. There’s so much more. Her film and theater career spanned six decades, and she lived 96 years. Here’s a photo of her from her Bryn Mawr days. That’s where she fell in love with acting, much to my everlasting joy. If this is your first introduction to the awesome that is Katharine Hepburn, congratulations. You’re in for a treat. Follow some links, watch some movies, and know this: it has never been easy to buck society’s stereotypes, and in a time when it was even less easy than it is now, she helped to pave the way for the rest of us by being an authentic woman in the face of pressure from all sides to act like a lady.

Thanks, Kate.


Links!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katharine_Hepburn
http://www.biography.com/people/katharine-hepburn-9335828